Common Ground High School

Education
Photo Credit: David Sunberg
Photo Credit: David Sunberg
Photo Credit: David Sunberg
WOOD: ADVANCING ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING AND LEADERSHIP

The 180 students of Common Ground High School do more than study urban farming and sustainability. They live it each day in a building that’s now a national model of what is possible in green school construction.

Project Architect Gray Organschi Architecture
Timber Engineer Bensonwood
General Contractor Newfield Construction
Location 358 Springside Avenue,
New Haven, Connecticut
Completed 2016
Source reThink Wood

 

Franklin Elementary School

Education
Photo Credit: MSES Architects
Photo Credit: MSES Architects
Photo Credit: MSES Architects, City Construction Company
Photo Credit: MSES Architects, City Construction Company
Photo Credit: MSES Architects, City Construction Company
West Virginia elementary school is first in U.S. to use cross laminated timber (CLT)

They set out to build a school that would last; they ended up achieving two significant firsts. The town of Franklin, West Virginia needed a new elementary school—quickly and on budget. Some might have expected this small, rural community to take a conventional approach. But area leaders wanted more for their students. So they did two things no one else had done: Franklin Elementary is the first design-build school project for the state of West Virginia, and the first school in the U.S. to be built using cross laminated timber (CLT).

Project Architect MSES Architects
Engineer MSES Consultants, Inc. / Clayton L. Carter Professional Engineer, Inc.
General Contractor City Construction Company
Location Franklin, West Virginia
Completed 2015
Source WoodWorks

 

Student Housing Saves with Wood (U of W - Mercer Court/Elm Hall)

Education
Photo Credit: Benjamin Benschneider
Photo Credit: Benjamin Benschneider
Photo Credit: WG Clark Construction; Mahlum Architects
University of Washington used wood framing to meet ambitious design goals

In 2012, the University of Washington (UW) completed a $109 million, five-building construction project, adding nearly 1,700 student housing beds. Known as West Campus Student Housing – Phase I, the 668,800-square-foot project was the first of four phases planned by UW to add much-needed student housing to its Seattle campus, which has an enrollment of more than 42,000 students.

projectuniversity of washington, west campus student housing
architectmahlum architects
structural engineercoughlin porter lundeen
contractorswalsh construction & wg clark construction
completed july 2011 & 2012
sourcewoodworks
  

 

Duke Lower and Middle Schools

Education
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Innovations in Wood: Duke Lower and Middle Schools Case Study
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Innovations in Wood: Duke Lower and Middle Schools Case Study
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Innovations in Wood: Duke Lower and Middle Schools Case Study
Innovations in Wood
Duke Schools is an enriching space that balances cost, functionality and environmental objectives. Overall, the project included three new wood-frame middle school buildings, two new wood-frame lower school buildings, the renovation of four existing lower school buildings and a new steel-frame gymnasium, for a total of 79,204 square feet.
project/ownerduke school
locationdurham, north carolina
architectdtw architects & planners
structural engineergkc associates
completed2009
sourcewoodworks

 

Bethel School District – WA

Education
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Bethel School District – WA Case Study
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Bethel School District – WA Case Study
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Bethel School District – WA Case Study
Photo Credit: WoodWorks Bethel School District – WA Case Study
Cost-Efficient Wood Framing Leads to Energy Efficient Schools

Bethel School District is proving they can save construction costs and build energy-efficient schools at the same time, leaving more money for educating students.The District reports an 81 percent ENERGY STAR rating overall; several of their 17 elementary and six middle schools have ratings ranging from 95 to 98 percent. And, while size, configuration and age of the 23 facilities vary, one thing remains constant: each is wood-frame.

location5 different school examples
completed2006-2012
sourcewoodworks

 

El Dorado High School Students Get the ‘Wow’ They Deserve

Education
Photo Credit: Dennis Ivy, courtesy WoodWorks
Photo Credit: Dennis Ivy, courtesy WoodWorks
Photo Credit: Dennis Ivy, courtesy WoodWorks
Photo Credit: Dennis Ivy, courtesy WoodWorks
Design Team for New High School Saved $2.7M with Wood Framing

El Dorado High School was one of the first schools in Arkansas to make extensive use of wood following a change in state policy that had previously prohibited wood in school construction. 

projectel dorado high school, el dorado, ar
architectCADM Architecture, inc.
structural engineerengineering consultants, inc.
general contractorbaldwin & shell construction company
completed2011
sourcewoodworks

 

Wood in Education

Education
Photo Credit: Latreille Delage Photography and Nic Lehoux
Photo Credit: Latreille Delage Photography and Nic Lehoux
Photo Credit: Latreille Delage Photography and Nic Lehoux
Photo Credit: Martin Tessler
Healthy, durable and naturally beautiful

Wood enhances our learning environments, both physically and psychologically. People spend as much as 90 per cent of their time inside buildings. Given this situation, it is clear that the design of our indoor environments is of critical importance to human health. This publication highlights several schools in North America in the context of how wood helped to achieve objectives such as human health and well-being, improved indoor air quality and carbon sequestration.

sourcenaturally:wood

 

Wood in Higher Education

Education
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Wood: An Integrated Tool to Meeting Sustainability Goals at UBC
Wood-frame and mass-timber construction has been utilized in a variety of buildings at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Moving forward, these buildings provide a foundation for the expanded scope of wood in sustainable buildings. This publication highlights several buildings at UBC in the context of how wood helped to achieve objectives such as cultural significance, technical capabilities, and environmental benefits in wood construction.
sourcenaturally:wood

 

CENTRE FOR INTERACTIVE RESEARCH ON SUSTAINABILITY

Education
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
Photo Credit: Don Erhardt
WOOD: AN INTEGRAL PART OF A NET-POSITIVE BUILDING

A flagship project of the University of British Columbia's Campus as a Living Laboratory initiative, the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) is studied to explore the role of buildings in maintaining environmental integrity and human well-being. The four-story building emphasizes simple forms and materials, as exemplified by an exposed wood structure and visible connections. On track for LEED Platinum certification and Living Building Challenge recognition, CIRS is a 'regenerative' building, which means that it seeks not only to reduce harmful environmental impacts, but to improve both the environment and lives of its inhabitants. Among its positive impacts, the carbon sequestered in the wood structure is greater than the carbon emitted during extraction, manufacturing, transportation and installation of its building materials. CIRS also harvests and returns to campus more renewable energy than it takes from the electricity grid.

projectCentre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS)
locationvancouver, bc
architectperkins + will canada architects co.
structural engineer fast + epp structural engineers
general contractorheatherbrae
completed2011
sourcenaturally:wood

 

Designing Wood Schools

Education
Photo Credit: Benjamin Benchneider
Photo Credit: Benjamin Benchneider
Cost, Functionality and Performance

As demand grows and budgets shrink for new educational facilities, many school districts are turning to wood-frame construction for its cost effectiveness. They're finding that, in addition to less expensive material costs, wood offers other advantages—such as speed of construction, design versatility and the ability to meet green building goals—while creating positive learning environments and meeting all code requirements for safety and performance. This publication highlights several schools in the US in the context of how wood helped to achieve objectives such as cost effectiveness, speed of construction, safety, durability and environmental performance.

sourcewoodworks